Myths about COVID-19 among Sindh Population: A Survey based Study.

Main Article Content

Saira Baloch
Sanya Ashraf
Ashraf Ali Khaskheli
Syed Noorain Hyder
Rajesh Kumar
Muhammad Ramzan
Om Vaswani
Shafiq Hyder
Monis Samoo
Taha Qureshi
Aroon Damani
Karan Kumar
Muhammad Riyyan

Abstract

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unprecedented challenges globally, with misinformation significantly impacting public health responses. The rapid spread of myths and misconceptions, particularly through social media, has necessitated a deeper understanding of the factors influencing public perception and behavior towards COVID-19 preventive measures, transmission, and treatment options.


Objective: This study aimed to quantify the prevalence of COVID-19 related myths among the Sindh population, explore associations with sociodemographic characteristics, and assess the impact of misinformation on public health practices.


Methods: Employing a cross-sectional survey design, we recruited 400 participants using convenience sampling. The survey comprised two parts: demographic information and a structured questionnaire assessing beliefs about COVID-19. Questions were designed to capture myths related to transmission, prevention, treatment, and vaccination. Responses were analyzed using SPSS software version 25, employing descriptive statistics, t-tests, and ANOVA to identify significant associations between demographic factors and susceptibility to myths. Ethical approval was obtained from the Research Ethics Committee of Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences.


Results: The study found that 60% of participants harbored high levels of myths about COVID-19. Misconceptions were significantly associated with age, education, occupation, and marital status. Notably, 85% of respondents reported social media as their primary information source. Misconceptions included the efficacy of disinfecting groceries (62%), the risk posed by non-vegetarian food (12%), and misinformation about COVID-19 transmission through mosquitoes (5%). Additionally, there was a widespread belief in ineffective preventive measures and treatments, such as the use of home remedies (55%) and the misconception that vaccines cause COVID-19 (7%).


Conclusion: The high prevalence of COVID-19 myths among the Sindh population highlights the critical role of social media in spreading misinformation. The study underscores the need for targeted interventions to address misinformation and enhance the public's ability to discern reliable information, particularly on digital platforms.

Article Details

How to Cite
Baloch, S., Ashraf, S., Khaskheli, A. A., Hyder, S. N., Kumar, R., Ramzan, M., Vaswani, O., Hyder, S., Samoo, M., Qureshi, T., Damani, A., Kumar, K., & Riyyan, M. (2024). Myths about COVID-19 among Sindh Population: A Survey based Study. Journal of Health and Rehabilitation Research, 4(1), 1547–1551. https://doi.org/10.61919/jhrr.v4i1.649
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Articles
Author Biographies

Saira Baloch, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Sanya Ashraf, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Ashraf Ali Khaskheli, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Syed Noorain Hyder, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Rajesh Kumar, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Muhammad Ramzan, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Om Vaswani, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Shafiq Hyder, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Monis Samoo, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Taha Qureshi, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Aroon Damani, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Karan Kumar, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Muhammad Riyyan, Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro Pakistan

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