Effects of Screen Time and Phonemic Segmentation in School Going Children

Main Article Content

Tamkeen Abid
Iqra Javed
Shamsa kanwal
Hafiza Madeeha Mushtaq
Ghazal Awais Butt
Shahzadi Arshad

Abstract

Background: The rapid proliferation of digital devices has significantly altered children's exposure to screen time, raising questions about its impact on their cognitive and language development. Previous research has indicated both potential benefits and drawbacks of screen time, particularly concerning phonological awareness and language skills in young children. This study seeks to explore the relationship between screen time and phonemic segmentation abilities, a critical component of phonological awareness, in school-going children.


Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the amount of screen time and phonemic segmentation abilities in children aged 4 to 7 years, accounting for variables such as age, gender, and parental education levels.


Methods: Conducted at the Department of Speech and Language Pathology, PSRD College of Rehabilitation Sciences, Lahore, this study utilized a cross-sectional design with a sample size of 253 children from various schools. The inclusion criteria were children with normal speech and language development who had exposure to digital devices, excluding those with phonological disorders or developmental delays. The YOPP-Singer Test of Phonemic Segmentation was employed to assess phonemic awareness. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 25, with ANOVA and Pearson Correlation tests to examine the relationship between screen time and phonemic awareness.


Results: Among the participants, 56.1% were in kindergarten, with a gender distribution of 40.3% male and 59.7% female. Parental education varied, with 34.8% holding bachelor's degrees and 24.5% having M.Phil. qualifications. The majority of children (51.8%) reported 1 hour of screen time daily. The ANOVA test revealed no significant difference in phonemic segmentation abilities across different screen time durations (F=.526, p=.665). However, a Pearson Correlation analysis indicated a slight, non-significant positive correlation between screen time and phonemic segmentation abilities (r=.110, p=.080).


Conclusion: The study suggests that the amount of screen time, within certain limits, is not significantly associated with phonemic segmentation abilities in children aged 4 to 7 years. These findings highlight the complexity of screen time's impact on language development, suggesting that factors beyond the duration of screen exposure, such as content quality and parental involvement, may play critical roles.

Article Details

How to Cite
Abid , T., Javed , I., kanwal, S., Mushtaq , H. M., Butt , G. A., & Arshad , S. (2024). Effects of Screen Time and Phonemic Segmentation in School Going Children. Journal of Health and Rehabilitation Research, 4(1), 1514–1518. https://doi.org/10.61919/jhrr.v4i1.650
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Articles
Author Biographies

Tamkeen Abid , Alam School for Speech and Learning SADA Lahore Pakistan.

Speech & Language Pathologist, Alam School for Speech and Learning, SADA Lahore, Pakistan.

Iqra Javed , University of Health Sciences Lahore Pakistan.

Lecturer, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.

Shamsa kanwal, Govt. Special Education Center Vehari Pakistan.

Speech Therapist, Govt. Special Education Center Vehari, Pakistan.

Hafiza Madeeha Mushtaq , Speech and Language Pathology/Therapy Clinic Pakistan.

Speech & Language Pathologist, Speech and Language Pathology/Therapy Clinic, Pakistan.

Ghazal Awais Butt , Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine Rawalpindi Pakistan.

Senior Speech Therapist, Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

Shahzadi Arshad , University of Health Sciences Lahore Pakistan.

Lecturer, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.

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