Evaluating Malaria Prevalence Across Different Age and Gender Groups in Peshawar Through Light Microscopic Analysis

Main Article Content

Aamna Raasti
Omazia Nasir
Muhammad Arslan Khalid
Shifa Zafar
Wali Khan
Syeda Fatima Nadeem

Abstract

Background: Malaria poses a significant public health challenge in Peshawar, Pakistan, where conditions are ideal for Anopheles mosquito breeding. This study investigates the prevalence of malaria across different demographic groups, employing light microscopy to detect Plasmodium parasites.


Objective: The primary objective was to assess the prevalence of malaria in specific age and gender groups in Peshawar using light microscopy. A secondary aim was to identify demographic patterns in malaria spread to facilitate targeted public health interventions.


Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from January to August 2021. It included 750 participants suspected of having malaria, selected through systematic sampling. Diagnostic procedures involved preparing both thick and thin blood smears stained with Giemsa to identify and quantify malaria parasites.


Results: Among the participants, 299 tested positive for malaria, representing an infection rate of 39.87%. Males exhibited a higher infection rate of 43.83% compared to females at 35.77%. The highest prevalence was observed in the 41-60 age group, with an infection rate of 50.83%. Statistical analysis using a Chi-square test indicated a significant variation in malaria prevalence by gender (Chi-square = 5.079, df = 1, P = 0.0242).


Conclusion: The study confirms a substantial malaria burden in Peshawar, with notable variations by gender and age. These results support the need for more focused malaria control strategies that address the specific vulnerabilities associated with these demographic factors.

Article Details

How to Cite
Raasti, A., Nasir, O., Khalid, M. A., Zafar, S., Khan, W., & Nadeem, S. F. (2024). Evaluating Malaria Prevalence Across Different Age and Gender Groups in Peshawar Through Light Microscopic Analysis. Journal of Health and Rehabilitation Research, 4(2), 767–771. https://doi.org/10.61919/jhrr.v4i2.952
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Articles
Author Biographies

Aamna Raasti, Riphah International University- Faisalabad- Pakistan.

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology- Riphah International University- Faisalabad- Pakistan.

Omazia Nasir, Department of Microbiology- Quaid-I-Azam University- Pakistan.

Faculty of Biological Sciences- Department of Microbiology- Quaid-I-Azam University- Pakistan.

Muhammad Arslan Khalid, Fatima Memorial Hospital College of Medicine and Surgery- Lahore- Pakistan.

Fatima Memorial Hospital College of Medicine and Surgery- Lahore- Pakistan.

Shifa Zafar, Fatima Memorial Hospital College of Medicine and Surgery- Lahore- Pakistan.

Fatima Memorial Hospital College of Medicine and Surgery- Lahore- Pakistan.

Wali Khan, Cosmic Institute of Science and Technology- Islamabad- Pakistan.

Department of Public Health- Cosmic Institute of Science and Technology- Islamabad- Pakistan.

Syeda Fatima Nadeem, Sheikh Zayed Medical College- Rahim Yar Khan- Pakistan.

Department of Microbiology- Sheikh Zayed Medical College- Rahim Yar Khan- Pakistan.

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